The ijad and psychological stress

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The ijad and psychological stress

Postby grafvonbarnez » Wed Apr 30, 2014 10:40 pm

A question came to me today: how do ijad deal with major personal issues like anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress? They're very human-like in most ways, but does their unique bond with their host help or hinder their reactions? In a human/ijad bond, I can see how the ijad would be able to help their human host, if only by being able to influence their nervous system, but is it a two way path? And when bonded to something like a ghanat, how well does the animal cope with what must be a rather alien feeling coming from their partner?

Also, how do ijad deal with the death of a partner? I know it's been said that human/ijad pairings are very analogous to marriage, so the death of either half is likely to be as or more trying than a human's loss of a spouse. How does the death of a long time, not usually sapient host compare? As traumatic? Or more akin to the loss of a beloved pet or service animal?
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Re: The ijad and psychological stress

Postby Joshua A.C. Newman » Thu May 01, 2014 2:21 pm

grafvonbarnez wrote:A question came to me today: how do ijad deal with major personal issues like anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress? They're very human-like in most ways, but does their unique bond with their host help or hinder their reactions? In a human/ijad bond, I can see how the ijad would be able to help their human host, if only by being able to influence their nervous system, but is it a two way path?


Oh, definitely.

And when bonded to something like a ghanat, how well does the animal cope with what must be a rather alien feeling coming from their partner?


Well, ghanats are domesticated animals, so they, like dogs, are particularly receptive. But even for a wild animal, well, you know how dogs run around with ticks on them and it's gross, but they don't even know it's happening? It's like that, only the ticks are telling you that it's OK, and keep feeding you.

Also, how do ijad deal with the death of a partner? I know it's been said that human/ijad pairings are very analogous to marriage, so the death of either half is likely to be as or more trying than a human's loss of a spouse. How does the death of a long time, not usually sapient host compare? As traumatic? Or more akin to the loss of a beloved pet or service animal?


Their bonds with humans are, for the most part, complex and individual relationships. But for most people, if someone they went on a date with then died, it would still be kinda rough. Then imagine it happening within a marriage or other family bond. Then imagine that you could feel them die.
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Re: The ijad and psychological stress

Postby Foghammer » Thu May 01, 2014 2:52 pm

Joshua A.C. Newman wrote:Then imagine that you could feel them die.

I don't know how to put this without sounding ridiculously creepy or weird, but here goes: There is something beautiful in this, in the sense that (from a creative standpoint) there is a lot of storytelling potential in the Ijad, how they interact with humans, how they bond with them (in any aspect), and how they deal with the loss of a second sentient mind that they have been carried by.

Losing a dog (ghanat) is hard. Mine (my dog, keep up) had to be put to sleep two years ago, and I still miss her, but I was far from devastated. But if one of my close friends, or God forbid one of my close family members (host) died? I don't know how I would react. I can't imagine. And then you tack on the notion that an Ijad could FEEL that happening in addition to the emotional damage. UGH. That's some hardcore feels right there.

I love the Ijad. Best fictional species ever.

[/creepy]
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